Category Archives: Internet

Spending Cryptocurrency

So we’ve all heard about bitcoin and the other myriad of cyber cheddar out in the virtual world. Earning your currency can be done in a bunch of different ways with varying levels of difficulty. Regardless, once you have your stash, what do you spend it on? Early on, online stores that allowed bitcoin as payment for their products or services rendered were very few and far between. However, over the last several years, online venues of just about everything under the sun has joined the tidal wave of the inevitability to accept cryptocurrencies as a means to further sales.

Now that you have your stash of coin and have wondered what and where to spend it on, allow us to suggest a couple of our favorite online activities that welcome the use of your coin and encourage you to spend, spend, spend!

Fast Food and Restaurants

Yes, you can actually use bitcoin to eat! Not all eateries accept bitcoin, but there are dozens that do. To suggest a few:

  • Get a Whopper meal at Burger King
  • Grab a doughnut and a coffee at Dunkin’ Doughnuts
  • Chill with your Mexican favorites at Chipotle
  • Have a pizza nigh with Papa Johns
  • Or snag a delicious wheel of dough at Dominos

Gambling

Who doesn’t like to gamble? Some people love it, some hate it…some can’t help themselves! Besides, the upside is that you may come away with more than you started with – who can argue with that? Before you start – We think that if you want to feel comfortable using cryptocurrencies at an online gambling sites (or anywhere for that matter), you need to be up to speed on what these currencies entail, including their history and how they can be used at online gambling sites. So be sure to research your coin of choice before you start using it as a gambling stake.

Keeping the above in mind, head to Cryptocoin Gambler to help you research your options before hitting up your gambling site of your choice. The info you gain may just increase your chances of walking away with a bulging wallet!

Honestly, there are way to many stores to mention in this article to suggest where to spend your coin. The best advice we can give you is to do your research – check out each store carefully, reviews, how long the store has been active, return policies, etc. Be smart, be cautious and you will do fine when it comes to spending your coin. But, as always, have fun!

DDoS attacks and how to protect against them.

A DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attack is an attempt to overwhelm the resources available to a network, application or service so that regular users cannot gain access.  With these types of attacks more frequent and easy to locate willing parties to execute them, it’s become a paramount reason to find and pay for ways to protect against them.  DDoS attacks can strike whenever, so don’t wait for an attack to bring your business to its knees. Create a system that can help you survive a DDoS attack, enabling you to mitigate the risk if one does occur.

The best way to detect a DDoS attack is to look out for huge increases in traffic to your website. Stay alert, monitor traffic and set thresholds for auto reports when these are exceeded.  If you’re serious about resisting and recovering from DDoS attacks, consider training a member of your team in one of the many security certifications available.  Hiring a reputable company for your DDoS protection may be a better idea, no matter what your business may be.  Sometimes having the right people on your side is best for everyone.

If you use open source platforms like WordPress users, installing updates as soon as they’re available reduces the risk of attack. Updates could fix vital security flaws, and failing to update could open you to security loopholes and any potential new DDoS prevention tools or techniques.  Always keep a keen eye out for the updates for all of your hardware and software.

On the user side of things, paying special attention to your connected devices will help you wade through any potential DDoS attacks on those devices. Also, choose ISPs that provide DDOS mitigation, sign up for security threat alerts about newly discovered zero day vulnerabilities and deploy firewalls to your network.

The key is to be vigilant and keep a keen eye on all of your equipment.  Keeping that in mind, you should be safe in the end.

How to tell if your ISP is throttling your bandwidth – and what to do about it.

When you sign up for broadband, you’re offered ‘up to’ speeds in most cases. For certain tasks – online gaming, video streaming, design work where you’re collaborating with people in other locations – you need that high speed. But you don’t always get it.

Bad cabling in your local area, lots of neighbors on the same copper wire, or poor quality equipment in your home can all slow down your connection.

But so can your ISP.

ISPs handle data in a bunch of different ways. Not all of them work out well for you. Sometimes, ISPs throttle your data (which they’re not supposed to do), or queue it and let it languish. Sometimes, there are other factors in play.

So when you’re not getting the speeds you pay for, what’s causing the glitch?

Test your speed

First things first: check your internet speed. Use a test site like speedtest.net to find out how fast your upload and download speeds are. Check a few times, to get an average, and if you can do it, run tests at high and low traffic times – in prime time and super early in the morning, for instance. Write your numbers down or take screenshots, and compare them to what your ISP promised you.

Test your speed with a VPN

VPNs are virtual private networks. They conceal the contents of your data by wrapping it in a layer of encryption, meaning an ISP doesn’t know which data to throttle. If it’s looking for gaming data, streaming data or big image files – the stuff that takes up bandwidth – it can’t identify it. Your data gets treated the same as everyone else’s.

So grab a free trial from a couple of VPNs, download and fire them up, and head back to your speed test. This time, test speeds with and without the VPN enabled. Try a couple because you never know which VPN gives the fastest service in your area, and which you prefer using. As before, make several tests to give you an average. And remember to test at different times too.

Pro tip: most VPNs let you pick your own server – the place your traffic emerges to join the regular internet. Choose one close to you and with low server load, so you get the fastest VPN connection.

What do your results mean?

If you consistently saw slower speeds with a VPN than without, the chances are you’re not
being throttled. If you saw faster speeds with a VPN during high traffic times and slower speeds with a VPN during low traffic times, it looks like your data is being queued or throttled in prime time. Makes sense from your ISP’s point of view, not a lot from yours. And you’re the one paying.

The solution:

If your problem isn’t throttling, move on to chasing other things that might be slowing you down: your modem, cables, or computer settings could all be slowing your connection. If it’s not them, try contacting your ISP.

If throttling is your issue, pick the VPN you liked the best, pay a few dollars a month and get the speeds you’re paying for!