5 Weird Easter Traditions From Around the World

Looking for a new way to celebrate Easter this year? To mark their collection of Easter-themed online slot games, we’ve teamed up with bgo.com to list the 5 weirdest holiday traditions around the world. From carving farm animals out of butter to eating chocolates shaped like Australian marsupials, check them out.

1. Whip Cracking in Slovakia

In Slovakia, it’s not unusual for girls to be woken up by a cold bucket of water over their head during the Easter weekend. Dousing women with water, and even hitting them lightly with a whip made from braided willow (known as a korbá?), is one of the country’s most popular traditions. Though it’s enough to leave modern feminists cringing, many Slovakians believe the whipping makes women strong, beautiful and healthy for the spring.

2. Butter Lambs in Russia

No Russian dinner table is complete at Easter without a hunk of butter made to look like a lamb. Whether it’s shaped by hand or prepared using a mould, the butter lamb is supposed to symbolise ‘the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world’. The lamb is usually finished off with a little red ribbon around its neck to represent the Blood of Christ.

3. Chocolate Bilbies in Australia

You’re probably used to seeing chocolate bunnies on supermarket shelves around Easter time. But you’re probably less familiar with chocolate bilbies. To help raise awareness for the endangered Australian marsupial, chocolate manufacturers Down Under now sell bilby-shaped sweet treats for the holiday. Many donate a hefty chunk of the proceeds to charities working to conserve the country’s native wildlife.

4. Giant Omelettes in France

Every Easter Monday, residents of the small town of Bessières in south west France come together to make a giant omelette. Harking back to the days of Napoleon, the quirky tradition involves over 50 volunteers, 150,000 eggs and one giant pot measuring 4-metres wide. Thousands turn up every year to watch the spectacle and taste the famous omelette for themselves.

5. Bunny Hunting in New Zealand

If the Easter Bunny knows what’s good for him, he’ll skip a visit to New Zealand over Easter. In the region of Otago, residents hold an annual rabbit and hare cull to stop the pests damaging farmland. The tradition began in the 1990s and now attracts over 300 hunters every year, with teams like the Hoppers Stoppers and Wabbit Warriors all working to help local farmers to protect their crops.

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I'm an eternal optimist, follow a Buddhist philosophy, geek of many areas, entrepreneur, learning the Chinese language, a die-hard sports fan, love politics and nuclear submarines.

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