Google FRP Account Verification

If you’re a hardcore Android user like me – read on, because this information may save your device one day! So Factory Reset Protection (FRP) is a built-in security feature Google introduced for all Android devices running Android 5.1 and higher. FRP, in simple words, prevents other people from using your device if they forcefully perform a factory reset on your device from either recovery or by flashing a new firmware. In either of the cases, if a factory reset is performed on your device without your authorization, then the FRP will kick-in when the device boots and ask for the Google account login that was last used on the device. This makes sure that you or someone you trust is doing the reset of your device. 

If you’re not in the know, factory resetting an Android phone means restoring it to the factory settings. It obliterates all data from your Android phone, wiping the slate clean, for all intents and purposes. Once you’ve performed a hard rest like that, all of your data is gone, so make sure that you your device before this point.

Now imagine your phone gets stolen with all your information on it, all a thief needs to do is perform a factory reset on your device using the recovery mode, and they have a new phone. You can neither wipe data remotely or track its location as all your preferences has been wiped clean from the device. This is the nightmare scenario that the common user imagines. 

But, with FRP a thief cannot use your device after a factory reset unless he has your Google account and its password. Whether they are using the recovery mode or a new firmware, they just cannot remove the protection without your Google account ID and password.

After an authorized factory reset, your device will give the following message to the user attempting to sign-in: “This device was reset. To continue, sign in with a Google Account that was previously synced on this device.” Basically, FRP will lock a user out of your device if they try to do an authorized factory reset. 

Once FRP is enabled on an Android device, if you or someone else tries to format/factory reset the device using the normal Backup and Reset setting, you’d require the device’s security PIN first to access factory reset setting.

But let’s say that you don’t have the correct information to get through the FRP? Some crafty people have learned how to unlock a Samsung Galaxy s10 locked by At&t . You can follow these instructions and in no time you’ll be back in business! Be careful though: other sly people might find this information too, so keep your devices close and under your watchful eye!  

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Patrick Allred

Life is simply amazing.

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