History of Computer Chess (video)

It’s not ‘new’ news, but in 2004 the Computer History Museum in Mountain View held a panel discussion on the History of Computer Chess, you can watch the technical discussion on Google video here.

The thing that has always fascinated me about computer chess programs is their relation to AI advancements and the future possibilities in that area. I’m still waiting for my personal ‘agent’. If you have any interest in Computer Chess programming here’s the Beginners page at GameDev.net.

Sargon IIIAnyone remember the classic Sargon on the Apple // or Z-80? Good times!

From the site:

Playing chess by computer began in the early 1950s, nearly as soon as computers became available.  As a human activity, chess is believed to require thinking, yet in 1997 a massively-parallel supercomputer, drawing on over four decades of continual advances in both hardware and software, defeated the best human player in the world.  Does playing chess require thinking? Or is human thinking perhaps a form of calculation, parts of which a computer can mimic? What is the tradeoff between knowledge and search? Was Claude Shannon’s 1950 prediction that studying computer chess might lead to applications in other areas fulfilled? This panel, comprising seminal contributors to the solution of this challenge including two of AI s leading pioneers will discuss these and other questions as well as the origin and development of computer chess and what it tells us about ourselves and the machines we build.

The following two tabs change content below.
I'm an eternal optimist, follow a Buddhist philosophy, geek of many areas, entrepreneur, learning the Chinese language, a die-hard sports fan, love politics and nuclear submarines.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *